I was looking at Fedora Server for a possible Samba Active Directory production server.   But Fedora has a short life cycle for me to use it in Samba AD production server.

“Fedora Server is a short-lifecycle, community-supported server operating system that enables seasoned system administrators experienced with any OS to make use of the very latest server-based technologies available in the open source community.”

While looking I found a neat thing called Cockpit.  According to Fedora Server, Cockpit is an easy administrator that allow you to:

“Manage your system simply with Cockpit’s powerful, modern interface. View and monitor system performance and status, and deploy and manage container-based services”

I installed Cockpit in both on Fedora Server and CentOS.  There are little bit of difference between what they show, and they have pluses and minus in each one.   Since I not using FS as a Samba AD production server, I will show some screenshots and there uses when using Cockpit on CentOS.

Installing Cockpit

Since I have a minimal CentOS 7.1611 with Samba 4.6.5 Active Directory server, and I installed Cockpit by SSL using the root.

yum install cockpit

Then enable cockpit.

systemctl enable --now cockpit.socket

Open the firewall if necessary. My firewall is disabled though.

sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=cockpit
sudo firewall-cmd --reload

Using Cockpit

Log into Cockpit using the internal IP address:9090, using either the root and root password or another user.  If you use another user beside root and the user has sudoer’s permission, check the box “Reuse my password for privileged tasks” if you want the user have privilege task.

Logging into Cockpit
Logging into Cockpit

 

The first screen is the System.  System Page shows you the CPU, the Memory, Disk I/O and the Network Traffic on the right.  On the left shows you some details about the server.

The System Page
The System Page

 

If something is listed in the blue color, you can modify the configuration or get more info.   I clicked on the blue “Show fingerprints”.

Show fingerprints
Show fingerprints

 

The Logs page show you the Errors, Warning, Notices and All for a particular time (recent, since reboot, last 24 hours or 7 day).

The Logs Page
The Logs Page

 

I click on Errors and it shows some errors, but also Winbindd in Error state even though it’s loaded and ready to server.   I clicked on that log.  I must be missing something.

Winbindd error
Winbindd error

 

The next page is the Networking Page.  It shows Sending and Receiving, Interfaces, Unmanaged Interfaces and Networking Logs.

Network Page
Network Page

 

Accounts is the next page and show the user full name and the username.  Also you can create a new account (user).

Accounts Page
Accounts Page

 

Next is the Services Page and it default to showing the System Services.  You can click on Targets, Sockets, Timer and Paths.

Services Page
Services Page

 

The first page in the bottom left is the Diagnostic Reports Page.

Diagnostic Reports Page
Diagnostic Reports Page

 

Click on the blue Create Report button to get a report but it can’t create a report because the sosreport utility is missing.

Missing sosreport utility
Missing sosreport utility

 

Next is the Kernel Dump Configuration Page and it shows the kdump service is running or stopped, the Reserved Memory, crash dump location and Test Configuration.

Kernel Dump Configuration Page
Kernel Dump Configuration Page

 

When you click on Test Configuration it takes you a pop-up called Test kdump settings.  If you click on Crash System, it will crash.

Test kdump settings pop-up
Test kdump settings pop-up

 

Next is the SELinux page.  I think if there any errors it will display them, but so far I don’t any errors.   If it might have to install setroubleshooter-server first.

SELinux Page
SELinux Page

 

Next is the Subscriptions Page.  Service Subscriptions are part of RHEL, and you can use RHEL subscription with CentOS I think.  Since I don’t have a subscription, I’m not sure.

Subscriptions Page
Subscriptions Page

 

The last page is the Terminal Page.  And if you click on the Reset button, it’s reset the terminal and stopped whatever it’s doing.

Terminal Page
Terminal Page

 

On the upper right side is the user you are using.   Click on the user and it will display several pages, including Display Language, About Cockpit, Account Settings, Authentication and Log Out.   Account Settings will allow you to change the password.

About Cockpit page shows the version of Cockpit is 138; however 138 is not in the Cockpit Release page.

User Page
User Page
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